Thursday, October 13, 2016

Motor Skills Disorder

Andrew continues to have difficulty making friends at preschool. Every day when I picked him up this week, except for today, he said, "I played by myself today Moochies. Nobody wanted to play with me." It just doesn't hurt him, it hurts me too.

One of the things that struck out to me when I was talking to Andrew about this was that he said he can't keep up with the other kids in his class. He said everyone is faster than him and can do things on the playground such as climbing that he can't do.  I put two and two together and his gross motor skills are just one factor that is hindering him from making friends. Andrew's motor skills have always been much worse than Trenton's. Gross motor difficulties is a very common problem with kids on the higher end of the spectrum. Andrew was very late learning how to jump and pedal. In fact, I have noticed the older he gets the more he does not want to ride a bike. I asked him why one day and he said that it is hard for him to pedal.  The older Andrew gets the more he refuses to do any type of physical activity because it is hard for him. He knows he can't do it and that others his age can do it. Therefore, it lowers his self esteem even more.

In general, Andrew is much more wobbly with his gross motor. He appears to be clumsy and most people pass it off as being clumsy. However, it is a much more serious issue than just being clumsy. The older he gets, the more his body grows, the harder it is for him to manage his body.

I've been doing lots of research and getting things together to help Andrew in this area. Here are a few articles that I came across that are very interesting. They explain this issue perfectly and it is a disorder all by itself for many people, Motor Skills Disorder. Motor Skills Disorder is a developmental disorder that impairs motor coordination in daily activities. Many kids with High-Functioning Autism  and Asperger’s experience deficits in motor skills development, which often manifest as abnormal clumsiness.

http://autism.lovetoknow.com/Motor_Skills_in_Autistic_Children

http://www.myaspergerschild.com/2013/09/motor-skills-disorder-in-kids-with-high.html

http://www.emedicinehealth.com/motor_skills_disorder/page3_em.htm#motor_skills_disorder_symptoms

I share this with you all tonight in hopes that the next time you see a young kid or adult that appears to be "clumsy"...they just may have a much bigger problem.

The more we educate the more aware others are! Knowledge is a big part of understanding others.

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